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Postpartum Recovery

I am on day 39 of my postpartum recovery, and I thought I’d share my experience. Mine will be different then most because my son is still in the NICU. Also, as a warning: Some of this might be TMI!

Immediately postpartum I felt fine. My chief complaints were back pain and exhaustion. The back pain was from the epidural, which is not something I was expecting– though it obviously makes sense. The exhaustion was from a myriad of things. The night before induction I could not sleep, and then my labor progressed quickly for a primigravida not allowing any rest even after the epidural. I also was dealing with processing all of the emotions of finding out my son had EA/TEF and having him shipped off to another hospital, along with trying to develop a breast milk supply by pumping every 2-3 hours around the clock. So when I was discharged from the hospital 18 hours after our baby boy was born the doctor warned me that this ‘fine’ feeling would pass as she believed I was running off of adrenaline. She made my husband promise to keep an eye on me.

Physically: 

Physically I needed to take 600-800mg ibuprofen every 6 hours around the clock for the first 3-4 days, and didn’t I felt it. My back stopped hurting by this point, and I hated how the ibuprofen gave me a stomachache!

My ‘nether’ region was not as sore as I expected it to be– Sure my stitches itched and burned a little, but using my peribottle and dermoplast every time I used the bathroom was perfect. Until my stitches completely healed (about 3 weeks pp) it felt like I was walking around with a tampon placed incorrectly… Best way to describe it. It was uncomfortable, but not painful.

My bleeding pp honestly surprised me– I was fully prepared for bleed like a stuffed hog for weeks, but I would say that by my 5th-6th day postpartum I didn’t need those giant overnight pads anymore and I switched to always infinity foam regular flow with wings. These things were heavenly! I could hardly feel they were there, and they ‘wicked’ away the moisture and kept me feeling dry. About 2.5-3 weeks pp I was mostly just having discharge and only needed liners.  I still need the liners, but otherwise I’m good.

I was warned about the hemorrhoids and the constipation, but I had no hemorrhoids and actually had mild diarrhea immediately pp. So I didn’t take my stool softener…. but on the 4th or 5th day I was in pain. I was so constipated and had stomach pain that felt like someone was stabbing me below the bellybutton. I took stool softeners and suffered through it. Godspeed my friends! Take the stool softener… even if you don’t think you need it!

Breastfeeding:

The lactation consultant informed me that it appeared I had IGT (insufficient glandular tissue), and probably wouldn’t be able to produce a lot of milk. Still, I was going to try! I was loaned a Medela Symphony from the NICU. It is a hospital grade pump made for exclusively pumping and costs close to two-thousand dollars! Luckily the NICU has a free loaner program for mothers to use while their babies are still in the hospital.

I pumped every 2-3 hours for 20 minutes. The NICU had pumping rooms so even when we were with him I could pump. I took 9 fenugreek pills a day, drank 4 cups of mother milk tea, held hot compresses to my chest while I pumped, looked at pictures of him while I pumped… and after 10 days the most I had ever produced was 0.2ml (combined from both breasts), and I was so exhausted– in 10 days I had not had more than an hour and half of uninterrupted sleep.

I was heartbroken and mourned the loss of my breastfeeding dream. I wish someone had told me that there were really women out there who physically couldn’t breastfeed. I was so unprepared for this, and this was one of the hardest things for me to come to terms with. Even now when someone asks me if I’m using formula or breast milk… I feel like I need to make excuses and explain to them why he’s only getting formula.

Emotionally:

My husband and myself were both very concerned that I was developing postpartum depression and postpartum anxiety. As an already anxious person, we really didn’t know how much of my pp emotional roller coaster was normal for me. For the first two weeks I was so upset and cried everyday– In the shower, while I was pumping, at his bedside, when I talked to his doctors, when we left to go back to the hotel… It was awful.

Now looking back I think I was just dealing with an extraordinary set of circumstances– We went from having a perfectly healthy baby to a baby with a life altering defect who needed surgery, and then he got sick, and I watched him turn blue in front of me… It was agony. What helped me realize that it wasn’t anything more was… When my son was having a ‘good’ day, I had a good day. When he was having a ‘bad’ day, I had a bad day… And it just turned out that he had a lot of ‘bad’ days in the beginning.

As for the anxiety– I still feel that from time to time. I have a hard time falling asleep because I’m thinking of him; I’m worried his nurse doesn’t know how he likes to be soothed by having someone talk to him, or thinking his resident forget to weight-adjust his medication for his 100gram weight gain, etc. That I think is just me being a mother… We’re supposed to be worried about our babies all the time, right?

Overall:

My postpartum recovery has been a lot easier on me than I thought it would be. The emotional aspect was probably the hardest. My 6 week appointment is tomorrow (technically I’ll just be 5 weeks and 3 days pp), and we’re going to discuss getting and IUD when I’m 8 weeks pp. My husband and I are thinking we’re done having children (thinking of going through this experience again literally makes me sick to my stomach), but we’re young and don’t want to do any permeant methods of birth control incase we change our minds. I’ve handled hormonal birth control well in the past and I think the Mirena IUD will be a good fit for us– I’m 23, don’t smoke, and have no plans to have children in the near future. We considered ParaGard which can last up to 10 years, (Mirena lasts up to 7), but I think we’re leaning to the Mirena. I’ll fill you in on how that goes later.

12.1.14

12.1.14

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Update!

Wow. What have a learned from the last 3 weeks? You need to go with the flow. As a super type A person, this has been incredibly difficult for me, but I’m getting better at it.

Losing my beautiful natural birth, missing out on the golden hour, having a baby in the NICU, having a baby undergo surgery on his 3rd day of life, having a baby face and overcome several bumps in the road to recovery, accepting I am part of the 3-5% of women who physically can not breastfeed, and many other things I’m sure I am forgetting to mention– they have helped me overcome my inability to ‘go with the flow’.

Baby C had surgery on the 28th of October. That morning C and I went back to see our baby boy, and meet with the anesthesiologist, surgeons, and neonatologists assigned to his case. They went over some aspects of his surgery, and we passed our cell phone numbers off the nurse who would be updating us throughout his surgery. Eventually they had to take him back, so we gave him kisses, and left teary eyed to wait. We were so excited, and terrified.

Finally the wait was up and we learned that the surgery went very smoothly. Our son tolerated it very well, and they were able to repair his fistula with one surgery. He had been impressing everyone since he was born, so we were not surprised that he did so well. We were overwhelmed with joy, and so thankful that he was on the road to recovery.

The next few days we faced several bumps in the road. They were worried about his blood pressure being too low, his lack of urine output, and he developed a pneumothorax on his left side. They had to start him on a drug to help his BP, and put in a chest tube to relieve the pneumothorax. Then they had to consult with nephrology because his kidney function tests were showing our boy was suffering from acute kidney injury. He also wasn’t able to be weaned off of the ventilator because he wasn’t fully awake yet, and they blamed that on his kidneys not filtering everything out.

It was several days of constant stress. It seemed like every time we took one step forward, we then took two steps back. Finally on November 1st they were able to remove the chest tube on his right side. Then on the 2nd he started really waking up! When we did his evening care on the 2nd we saw him fully opened his eyes of the first time since before surgery. Then on the 3rd they were doing a test to see how he would handle being off the ventilator, and he did so well that they went ahead and extubated him!

Finally opening his eyes!

Finally opening his eyes!

On the 4th they did a swallow study to see how his repair was holding up. At first they thought he ‘passed’ but upon closer evaluation the radiologist told us he saw a small leak at the repair. We were so sad to hear that because they didn’t plan on retesting him until the 11th. The only reason we really cared about the extra time is because our son can not have anything to eat orally. He’s getting all of his nutrition IV, but his stomach is still empty and he feels ‘hungry’. He was so upset that night, and we can’t hold him because he still has a chest tube on his left side, and we couldn’t feed him. It took over an hour to calm him down. We felt so depressed and helpless and our hearts were heavy knowing we had another week before he might be able to eat.

Extuabted and awake. <3

Extuabted and awake. ❤

Today (5th) we took another step forward! His kidney function tests are finally starting to improve. They had kind of stalled out (still high, but were not inclining like they had been) over the last two days, but today was the first day those numbers finally started to come down! Nephrology told us that they were optimistic that this would eventually happen, but until I heard that the numbers were coming down I didn’t believe them. We also learned that surgery reviewed his swallow study results and decided that the ‘leak’ the radiologist saw was so tiny that they felt comfortable retesting on Friday the 7th, instead of waiting a full week.

We were elated to hear this. The sooner he ‘passes’ his test, the sooner he can begin oral feedings. Once he has oral feedings, if nothing is coming out of the chest tube then they can take it out and we can hold him! From there it’ll just be getting him to take a bottle and nurse well before we go home.

So our fingers are crossed for Friday.

Baby burrito with the pacifier is about the only way to soothe a 'hungry' baby.

Baby burrito with the pacifier is about the only way to soothe a ‘hungry’ baby.

It took several days for us to get a routine down. Running between the hospital and the hotel, trying to find time to sleep and eat, and me pumping every 2-3 hours around the clock– we were exhausted. More than exhausted, we were dead on our feet. I was getting the postpartum blues, and my husband was concerned not only for our son, but feared for my mental and physical health. Being discharged from the hospital 18hours after delivery, and running around as much as we were was hard on my body. I am happy to report now that we are doing a lot better.

Not only do we finally have a routine, but I’m doing better emotionally. My husband confessed to me that he was sick with worry for my mental health. For days after being discharged the stress of what was going on with our son, and learning I couldn’t breastfeed had me so depressed I couldn’t muster a smile if you offered cash endorsement. Finally we started getting ‘good’ news, I started to learn how to just take things as they come, and having our routine down– we are in a much better place than we were a week ago. I also came to accept that I can not produce breastmilk* and making peace with that brought me more peace than I can describe.

*While my son is in the NICU I’m going to continue to pump (on a less frequent basis than I have been) so that when we do his care I can give him ‘oral care’ with the few drops I am producing. It’s not much, but it is something I can give. Once we go home I am not going to pump anymore, and we will be using formula. Coming to this decision was very difficult for me, but I have the support of my husband and the lactation consultant.

 

 

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His unexpected birth story…

My husband's emotion in this situation says everything.

My husband’s emotion in this situation says everything.

My baby was born on October 25th, 2014 at 7:53 pm 6 weeks premature, and weighed 5 pounds 7 ounces and was 18.75 inches long.

Our birth story actually starts on October 15th, 2014. At nearly midnight exactly on that Wednesday morning I woke up with the very sudden urge to pee. I remember as I was scooting myself out of bed that I felt like I was going to pee the bed, but luckily I got out of bed before that happened. I rushed to the bathroom and was mortified to learn that I needed to change my pants. I changed my pants and was making my way back to bed when the sensation hit again! I knew this couldn’t just be pee.

I took a few seconds to let that realization sink in, and then I woke C to the news my water had broken at 32 weeks and 4 days. He jumped straight out of bed and started getting ready—I was not as composed. I wanted to talk to whoever was on call that night to let them know I was coming in, but after not being able to find that information I called labor and delivery and informed them we were on our way. Then I panicked about not having a hospital bag, the fact that I was losing so much fluid and getting it all over my pants, and the fact that my baby was just too small to come into this world. C was my rock, and he managed to talk me down. We were on our way!

The fog was so thick outside that we couldn’t see more than a few feet ahead of ourselves, so despite his desire to rush C couldn’t. While I wasn’t having contractions just yet, I called and started updating our parents, and both of our moms planned on meeting us at the hospital. Then  I started having very mild contractions every 2-5 minutes, which made the fact that C had to stop for gas that much more ‘exciting’. Luckily they remained very mild, and we made it to the hospital around 2am.

I was embarrassed that my pants were soaked, because it’s not like everyone else knew my water broke. C said, “You could be missing an arm, and be worried about a paper cut!”. I wrapped the towel that I had sat on during the ride (that was practically saturated with fluid) around my waist and we made our way into the hospital. The security guard asked us if we knew where we were going, and C started to tell him my water broke, and he responded, “Oh I know where you’re going, but do you know where your going?” He told us how to get to labor and delivery and up we went.

Upstairs I was immediately put into a room and suddenly it got very hectic. The hospital staff did a myriad of things to me: started an IV, double checked that my fluid was in fact amniotic and not urine, and hooked baby boy up to a heart rate monitor and a contraction monitor. Then Dr. H came into the room and checked my dilation, which was just 0-1cm, and he told us the plan: Short term goal was to give me steroid shots to mature baby’s lungs and make it 48 more hours before he came, and long term was he wanted to get us to 34 weeks. He ordered an ultrasound to see baby’s growth and we learned that baby was already measuring 4 pounds 10 ounces— 10 ounces over the 4 pounds the doctors wanted babies to be before they were were born.

Over the next 10 days I was given two steroid shots, started and weaned off of magnesium (to stop any contractions), given IV antibiotics to prevent infection, and baby boy was monitored with hour long NST 3 times a day. I was on bed rest, but I was allowed to get up to the bathroom and shower. C stayed by my side all 10 days and we had friends and family coming and going constantly. I had a very emotional time acknowledging that our son was going to the NICU after he was born. It was knowing that I wouldn’t get to hold him skin to skin, breast feed, or do any of the other things I hoped to do, but the staff at Baptist Health were wonderful at making us feel better and once I came to the realization that he was going to be okay my emotions got a lot easier to handle.

Then on Friday October 24th during our last NST baby C decided to give the nurses a scare by dropping his heart rate down into the 90’s for a minute or two, before coming back up. Up until this point his NST had always been beautiful and even compared to that of a full term baby. At that point the doctor on call said we should go ahead and move from antepartum to labor and delivery just so we could be monitored more closely and if anything was going to happen then that was were we needed to be. I was given a low dose of pitocin (a drug that starts contractions) because the next day we planned on inducing and he hoped that by giving me this low dose over night that it would make my body respond better to the pitocin in the morning.

That night I tried to rest as best I could, but knowing I was going to meet my baby the next day made sleep nearly impossible. Finally at 7am the next morning I was informed we were going on pitocin protocol which says that they will up my dose of pitocin every 30 minutes until my contractions were at a stable pattern.

By 9:30 am I was up to 12 on the pit, and was having regular (but not painful) contractions. Both of our mom’s were on their way. 11am I was up to a 16 and I was starting to feeling pain in my back and some mild discomfort with contractions. Around 11:30am we learned that the contractions are now at a stable pattern of every 2-3 minutes, but they needed to be stronger.

At 1 o’clock the contractions were more intense and I needed to breathe through them. My nurse advised me not to wait until my contractions were ‘white knuckling’ before I asked for the epidural. I was embarrassed asking for it so early because I thought I should be able to handle them better, but I did ask for the epidural. Unfortunately after learning I was only 1-2cm dilated the doctor said I could not have it until I dilated more because he didn’t want me to increase my risk for c-section. Within the hour the pitocin caught up with me and the contractions went from being painful to very, very intense.

Unfortunately I didn’t get to take a birthing class so I had no idea how to breathe through the contractions, and I wasn’t managing them very well. On top of that baby boy was moving around a lot and they kept having to find his heart rate, which meant that the nurse was pushing on my stomach during contractions to find it. I was put on my side, and was half leaning out of the bed, squeezing C’s hand and trying to breathe through them. He was such a champ and offered all the support he could to get me through them.

I kept saying they were coming too close together, but my TOCO wasn’t registering the contractions. So around 2pm the doctor decided to put in an IUP, which is a catheter that is inserted into the uterus along baby’s back, and it registers contractions and their intensity. He waited for my contraction to stop and tried to insert it, but I had another contraction right on top of it and I went from moaning to screaming from the pain. He stopped trying to insert it and waited for it to end, and as soon as it did he quickly inserted the catheter. C tells me that I didn’t even flinch when he inserted it when I wasn’t having a contraction. The doctor then informed me that I was 3-4 cm dilated and could have my epidural.

The nurse had give me two full bags of fluids before I could get the epidural so C and I went back to trying to breathe through contractions coming every 30 seconds to 2 minutes and registered very, very intense thanks to the IUP. I look back and honestly don’t know how we managed to get through them. In between them I was so exhausted I couldn’t even open my eyes. Once I did try ice in-between contractions because my mouth was so dry, but when I didn’t get the ice chewed before one started and I couldn’t find my ‘zone’ before the peak— I didn’t get ice anymore. If I didn’t focus and try to breathe I had this feeling like I was literally not going to survive the contraction.

Finally around 3pm the doctor who was giving me the epidural came in. My nurse helped me sit on the side of the bed, and squeeze her scrubs during contractions. I didn’t have a hard time staying still, but during contractions my whole body would shake slightly but he didn’t seem to mind. I didn’t feel any pain during the insertion of the epidural, and I called the doctor a magic man!  When they laid me back in bed we learned I had lost my bloody show, which meant progress was being made! C came back into the room at this time.

I only had one more extremely painful contraction after the epidural, and after that contraction all I felt was this super intense pressure: It felt like I had to both pee and have a bowel movement and I was terrified that I was going to pee the bed. When I told the nurse this she said that was normal, and that the epidural takes away the pain but not the pressure. I remember thinking that he must be crowning to be feeling so much pressure!

A nurse checked me around 3:15 pm and I was 5-6cm. So in roughly 2 hours I dilated from 1-2cm to 5-6cm. It was after this cervical check that things got scary! I went into tachysystole (which is where my contractions were coming on top of each other with no break in between— which is why I felt like he was crowning from the presssure), baby boy’s heart rate dropped, and my blood pressure plummeted— suddenly our room got very full. I put on my side, had an oxygen mask oxygen placed on my face, the pitocin was stopped, I was given an injection to stop my contractions, and I was given meds to raise my blood pressure. Despite how fast everything happened the nurses and the doctor were very calm in the room. In fact it didn’t register until a few minutes later that something very scary had happened.

They started us back on the pitocin at a half dose (I was on 18, so now I was 8, because they don’t do odd numbers with pit). At this point I was feeling no more pain whatsoever, and even the pressure was negligible, but I could still feel it. She did have to keep coming into the room every once in awhile to turn me side to side because she didn’t like his heart rate. At 6pm she told us that she couldn’t raise the pitocin every 30 minutes because baby boy wasn’t handling the contractions well, and my contractions were not ‘adequate’ on the monitor. They were regular, but not strong enough.

C and I started to prepare ourselves for a c-section. Then at 7:00pm my favorite nurse that we had in antepartum comes in to take over! She checks my cervix and we learn that I am fully dilated. The amazing thing is she was coming in to give us information on a c-section because until we learned I was fully dilated they were really beginning to think I was going to need it. My mom came back in at this point and we told her we were going to start pushing, and she went to grab C’s mom who was hanging out in the waiting room with C’s grandma, and his two aunts. She told us that when my mom came to get her they were joking that C’s grandma had the ‘mojo’ to send people into the labor and she had raised her hands and said, “Have that baby, A!”

My favorite nurse was ‘coaching’ my pushing, and I asked C to count for me. I was determined to push this baby out! Then Dr. H (the same doctor who I saw when I was first admitted, and who started me on low dose pit the night before) was the one who was taking over. He sat at the foot of the bed and examined me. He told me that this was going to be easy. He had my mom hold one leg, C hold the other, and he told me to push while he felt for the pressure. He used mineral oil to help my body stretch, and kept his finger under our son’s head so he could tell me when I was having a contraction— but he didn’t need to tell me. I could feel the pressure. I had the perfect epidural!

He told me my pushing was fantastic, and I needed to keep it up and push with ‘controlled rage’— I did just that. At some point he told C to look down and see his boy. C saw his head and his eyes watered with tears. I gave another push and my mom started crying and saying, “There he is!” He told me stop pushing, and he told me to reach down here and watch my son be born. One more push and he was out at 7:53pm. I only pushed for about 30 minutes.

He came out screaming (APGAR scores of 8/8), so the doctor placed him on my belly, and I held him there while C cut the cord. I was crying and thanking the doctor! The NICU team was waiting on the baby, but before they took him back to the unit and because he was doing so well they brought him over for me to hold. I cried and said thank you, because I didn’t think I would get a chance to hold him before they they took him to NICU. I only had a stage 2 laceration that needed two stitches, and everything seemed to be going perfectly. I was thinking we could actually take our baby home sooner than we thought.

Unfortunately we learned that night that he was going to need surgery to repair a tracheoesophageal fistula, and was being transferred to another hospital. No one could tell us how severe his was, or what the prognosis was. We were both so sick with worry, and it was a crazy crash from being so excited to have our son look so healthy to learn that he was a lot sicker than anyone had anticipated. The next few weeks would be the hardest weeks in our lives.

Read more about the first few days here.

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Week 22 (It’s a little bit late…)

This past week has been very busy so forgive me as I try to keep this post organized and cover all of the excitement!

On the pregnancy front this past week has been filled with much of the same symptoms. The only new additions is my anxiety is rising, and I noticed some VERY minimal swelling in my fingers and toes.

I’m hoping the swelling is what is to blame for my recent 5 pound weight gain– because I would totally own up to overeating, and I have not eaten enough to gain 5 pounds. Of course all of my pregnancy applications are telling me that weight gain is going to come on steadily from here on out. I guess a girl can’t go her entire pregnancy without any weight gain. haha. The only reason I even noticed the swelling is because I was on my feet a lot this week, and my normally bony feet were not bony, and I could tell my loose wedding band was getting significantly less loose. My feet were not sore, or crazy large. I hope I don’t have a ton of swelling, but I’ll take it if it comes.

I’m still enjoy feeling my son move, and I’m still burping every 30 seconds. My back is more sore than usual, but I think that is because of the very hectic past few days I’ve had. My skin is breaking out some, and my belly is growing. All normal and healthy pregnancy symptoms. I’ve still been craving fresh fruit, greek yogurt, and banana bread. So no complaints here on any of these.

While my anxiety is not a pregnancy symptom, it is a symptom of my pregnancy– if that makes any sense. As the weeks tick off, and my son grows larger I find myself getting very anxious about all of the potential dangers. My first big concern is gestational diabetes. My test for that is about 5 weeks away, and because I’m overweight and my mother had it with both of my sisters– I know I have a bigger chance of having it compared to others. I also know that I’ve been pretty good with my diet and I hope that is enough to keep us both healthy.

I’ve also been doing some reading about what to expect postpartum and the topic of ‘postpartum depression’ is coming up a lot. While I’ve never suffered from depression (only anxiety, and a mild case of OCD– neither of which I need medication to control), I’m so scared of developing postpartum depression. My mother had severe postpartum depression, nearly postpartum psychosis, and it drove her to attempt to take her own life only 9 months after my sister was born. I know that I have a wonderful husband who will be there to support me, as well as an amazing family– and even if I miss the symptoms, they will help me take care of myself (if I were to develop postpartum depression), it still makes me nervous. We are moving, 90 miles away from the city I’ve called home for the last decade, and 90 miles away from all of my friends, and I worry that I’m going to feel isolated and lonely and make me even more prone.

I hate that postpartum depression isn’t talked about enough, or given the attention it deserves. People expect moms to be so filled with total bliss that they don’t have a chance to be sad. For some women that is the case, but for others the whirlwind of hormones, and the major directional changes their life has recently went under– it is enough to mute the bliss of their new addition. Mom’s who suffer from postpartum depression did nothing wrong, they are clinically sick and just need time to heal and potentially medical intervention.

My anxiety is leading me to compulsive tendencies. It is such a scary thought to think that I’m doing everything I can to take care of my son the only ways I can: eating right, exercising, avoiding all the danger foods and medicines, and taking it easy. There are dangers that I can not protect him from and that scares me. I find myself focusing obsessively on his movements, trying to make sure he is staying as active as he is supposed to. I know in general most women do this without a second thought, but I have this fear the second I stop focusing and trying to feel him will be the second something goes wrong. I stop and focus and count his movements, and can’t relax until I’ve felt him move X amount of times, or listened to his heart rate on my own doppler.

I realize that I just spilled a bunch of DARK and SCARY and SAD things that my anxiety is making it impossible to ignore, but I always said that this blog was about the good, the bad, and the ugly– but I also want to make sure that despite having so many fears I am still enjoying my pregnancy. I am enjoying the time my husband and I have alone, the ease at which I can go out with my friends, the special time that I can share with my son between just the two of us. I’m also enjoying my growing belly, folding baby socks, and those punches and kicks at all hours of the day. It’s just hard to focus on ONLY the good, despite how much I want to.

Am I crazy, or do other women feel this way, too?

This week has been busy with more than just baby stuff.

My best friend’s birthday was at the end go July but our plans were delayed until this past week. We started off with a day at the zoo, an evening at the casino, and an amazing dinner at a small restaurant neither of us had ever been to. The next day we drove nearly two hours to a very small water park where we only managed to enjoy about an hour-and-a-half in the wave pool and the lazy river, before we both fell asleep on the lawn chairs and by the time we woke up it was 5pm and we needed to head back home. Despite the fact that we didn’t get to enjoy too much time in the water we had an amazing few days.

My friend and I at the casino for her birthday!

My friend and I at the casino for her birthday!

Then on Friday I’m spent the day with my husband, mother-in-law, and her husband on a highway yardsale that spans for several hundred miles. It was a long day and by the end of it I found myself skipping booths so I could sit down and relax. I did manage to find some amazing vintage pyrex mixing bowls, a rolling pin, and some baby shoes.

Then just yesterday (yes, by then I was technically 23 weeks) C’s grandmother gave me a box of over 60 pairs of baby socks, and 8 pairs of baby shoes. I was so touched by the gesture, and thankful for the gift (do you know how expensive baby socks are?). They are hand-me-downs from C’s baby cousin who is about 18 months old. I was also told that they have a ton of clothes for my son, enough that when she heard I was shopping for clothes she urged me not to. Apparently I’m going to have more than enough in that department. Considering I have no one on my side of the family who has recently had any children, I didn’t expect to get a lot of hand-me-downs.

So wow– this week has been crazy busy, and filled with a lot– But it’s good to write it all down and remember this one day when I’m looking back on it.